THE GENDER EQUITY PROJECT

MAKING CHANGE THROUGH EDUCATION

TO REDUCE GENDER BASED VIOLENCE WE NEED TO ACHIEVE GENDER EQUITY.       

CDVC AND ZONTA CLUB MACARTHUR WITH FUNDING FROM ZONTA INTERNATIONAL HAVE PRODUCED A TRAINING  PACKAGE ON ACHIEVING GENDER EQUALITY 

The package is available free to workers, agencies and services, particularly those who work with families. It aims to educate children and adults such as parents, primary caregivers, teachers and childcare workers, in promoting gender equality. Research informs us that gender based violence is caused by gender inequality, and to address inequality we need an understanding of how gender inequity and how gender inequality is formed and reinforced. If the world, including Australia, focused on gender equality, the level of violence against men and women would greatly reduce and men, women and children’s lives would benefit.

THIS PACKAGE IS AVAILABLE BY FOLLOWING THE LINKS BELOW OR CONTACTING This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

  • WE CAN BE EQUAL IF THERE IS A FOCUS ON ACHIEVING GENDER EQUITY AND EQUALITY
  • WE CAN BE EQUAL IF CHILDREN ARE RAISED TO BELIEVE IN GENDER EQUITY
  • BEING EQUAL WILL REDUCE VIOLENCE

THE NEED

As gender beliefs are formed by the age of 4 years, parents of pre-schoolers and workers have the opportunity to raise children to be equal thus to change society and reduce violence. Statistics tell us that girls as young as 13 years of age experience violence in relationships, therefore society needs to challenge inequality and focus on raising children to be respectful and achieve healthy relationships. In Australia over 300, 000 women experience violence in a year; of those women, more than half have children in their care. 

HISTORY OF GENDER INEQUALITY 

For centuries, women have been seen as less than men. Largely, they had to stay in the home, cook for men, have the babies AND care for them. Moreover, because this was seen as their only purpose, they did not go to school, or only for the minimum basics.  Women were generally seen as too stupid to know anything about these things, so that was the job of the man. Men were literally the boss of women, women were chattels. This difference in power of course made it difficult for women to stand up for themselves. Women were not allowed to vote, own land, or inherit or earn their own income. It was not until the 19th century that people began to openly doubt the system, when more men were given voting rights. Although this fight began early in the century, it was not until the 1860’s for women to begin to organise against this injustice, with the first national Suffragette society was formed in 1867. In the years following the number of these groups grew rapidly because of a court ruling.  Many men still thought women did not deserve the vote, and it was not until 1895 women in South Australia could vote ;  the rest of Australia in 1902 granting women to be persons in their own right.   Indigenous women did not get to vote until 1962 and Indigenous men and women were not classed as citizens until 1967.   But even after this, there were still many inequalities between men and women to be corrected.    The Equal Pay Act of 1969 made it illegal to pay men and women at different rates, but the statistics show this is still a gender issue in 2020. 

For access to the project, please click here  https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1iGNVkI6DZ6p_36NwFTZikuwEIXvLJ_-2?usp=sharing

 

We would appreciate your feedback and comments on this project;  as well as keeping us informed if your organisation finds the package useful.  The learning program can be used with staff, or clients and adjusted to meet needs.  

 

"Gender equality requires equal enjoyment by women and men of socially-valued goods, opportunities, resources and rewards." (http://web.unfpa.org/gender/resources3.htm#2 )

"Gender equity is the process of being fair to women and men." (UNFPA)

 

                                          

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